ZONIA KARINA MENENDEZ

Graduate Student in Mathematics

¡BIENVENIDOS!

 

GET TO KNOW: 
ZONIA KARINA MENENDEZ

I'm a PhD candidate in the mathematics department of Wesleyan University under the supervision of Christopher Rasmussen. I received my bachelors in science, majoring in mathematics, at the College of New Jersey.

Other than math and teaching I spend some free time:

  • taking pictures-mostly of nature

  • being creative in many different forms including: singing, digitally drawing, painting, or drumming

  • watching horror movies or shows

  • spending time with loved ones. 💕 

Throwback to 4am adventures at the beach
 

TEACHING

 
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CURRENT

Math Workshop tutor through the math department at Wesleyan Department.

PAST TEACHING

Spring 2020:

     Instructor at Wesleyan University for MATH 120: Elements of Calculus, Part II. 

Fall 2018:

     Instructor at Wesleyan University for MATH 119: Elements of Calculus, Part I. This class is intended for students who have not seen Calculus previously.

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TEACHING STATEMENT

Teaching is my main passion, as well as, being an ally to students especially those who are underrepresented. I am very eager to utilize and find ways to make my classroom a welcoming and supportive environment for all. If you have any tips or suggestions please contact me below.

 

RESEARCH

I am a rising sixth year graduate student currently pursuing my PhD at Wesleyan University in mathematics under the supervision of Chris Rasmussen. 

My research interests include Arithmetic Geometry, more specifically I am studying non cuspidal, non-CM sporadic points on the modular curves X_0(n) and X_1(M, MN).

On my bookstand:

On the Level of Modular Curves that Give Rise to Isolated j-invariants by Abbey Bourdon et al.

The Arithmetic of Elliptic Curves by Joseph H. Silverman

Elliptic Curves, Modular Forms, and Their L-functions by Alvaro Lozano-Robledo

Algebraic Curves by William Fulton

Number Fields by Daniel A. Marcus

 

An Introduction to Elliptic Curves

An invited Talk for a 403 Lecture at Southwestern University.

Abstract: An elliptic curve over the real numbers, ℝ, is the set of points (x,y) in ℝ^2 so that y^2 =x^3+ax+b for real numbers a and b (with a couple extra conditions). The study of elliptic curves has applications in cryptography and in proving Fermat’s Last Theorem (a theorem that went unproven for over 350 years!). Like the real numbers, we can define ‘addition' on an elliptic curve. We will study this further by looking at the graphs of elliptic curves. 

Assumed Knowledge of Audience: up to undergraduate linear algebra.

 

SERVICE & OUTREACH

Current Committees

  • Graduate Student Seminar Co-Organizer

  • AMS Chapter Secretary

Past Committees

  • Wesleyan Housing Committee Member

  • The College of New Jersey AWM Chapter Vice President

The EDGE Program

  • Mentor in 2019

  • Participant in 2016

 

EDGE 2019

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ORGANIZATIONS TO MENTION

Checkout: https://minoritymath.org/organizations/ 

for a longer list of organizations and institutions that support the advancement and training of minorities in the mathematical sciences. 

EDGE (Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education):

The EDGE Program is designed to strengthen the ability of women and minority students to successfully complete graduate programs in the mathematical sciences.

Lathisms (Latinx and Hispanics in the Mathematical Sciences):

Showcases the contributions of Latinx and Hispanic mathematicians during Hispanic Heritage Month 

Mathematically Black and Gifted:

Features the Accomplishments 
of Black Scholars in the
Mathematical Sciences.

 
 
 
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GET IN TOUCH

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Wesleyan University
Science Tower 613
265 Church Street
Middletown, CT 06459-0128
Office: 632 Exley Science Center

(860) 685-2620

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